Still: A MichaelJ. Fox Movie Film Review

REVIEWS George Wolf
maxresdefault (6)


 
 
New ArrivalQuick View
48 Hours Queue Jump + Interview
 
Regular Price£100.00Sale Price£75.00

 
Most PopularQuick View
1 Week Queue Jump
 
Price£30.00

 
Quick View
2 Week Queue Jump
 
Price£25.00

 
Quick View
3 Week Queue Jump
 
Price£20.00

 
 
 
New ArrivalQuick View
Feedback Only Review
 
Regular Price£25.00Sale Price£22.50

 
New ArrivalQuick View
5 Day Queue Jump
 
Price£50.00

 
New ArrivalQuick View
48 Hours Queue Jump + Interview
 
Regular Price£100.00Sale Price£75.00

 
Most PopularQuick View
1 Week Queue Jump
 
Price£30.00

 
Quick View
2 Week Queue Jump
 
Price£25.00

 
Quick View
3 Week Queue Jump
 
Price£20.00

 
 
 
New ArrivalQuick View
Feedback Only Review
 
Regular Price£25.00Sale Price£22.50

 
New ArrivalQuick View
5 Day Queue Jump
 
Price£50.00

 
New ArrivalQuick View
48 Hours Queue Jump + Interview
 
Regular Price£100.00Sale Price£75.00

 
Most PopularQuick View
1 Week Queue Jump
 
Price£30.00

 
Quick View
2 Week Queue Jump
 
Price£25.00

 
Quick View
3 Week Queue Jump
 
Price£20.00

 
 
 
For seven years after his initial diagnosis at the age of 29, Michael J. Fox was committed to hiding the signs of Parkinson’s disease.

 

He’s not at all interested in hiding anymore, and the inviting nature of his candor is a major reason why Apple TV’s Still: A Michael J. Fox Movie connects on such a warmly human level.

 

That really shouldn’t be a surprise. Since he rocketed to sitcom fame with Family Ties in the 1980s, Fox has remained a relentlessly likable guy. Short of stature but long on charm and comic timing, Fox hit superstardom with 85’s Back to the Future, then navigated the hits and misses to remain a staple of the big and small screen for decades.

 

Director Davis Guggenheim (An Inconvenient Truth, Waiting for Superman) anchors the film via his Q&A session with Fox, bringing life to the life story with a mix of subtle recreations and nimble editing.

 

As Fox reflects on his path to the Big Time, editor Michael Harte weaves in carefully selected scenes from Fox’s TV, movie and talk show work that illustrate the anecdotes with entertaining precision. It’s all a slick counterpoint to the reality of Fox’s health, which is acknowledged from the film’s opening minutes, when Fox tells of waking up with a trembling pinky and a “message from the future.”

 

His present now includes frequent physical therapy sessions, as well as numerous falls and injuries, but he accepts it with grace and self-effacing humor (which includes a priceless bit from an appearance on Curb Your Enthusiasm).

 

Fox also recounts his love story with wife Tracy Pollan, and the slices of his current home life with Tracy and their children make it easier to understand Fox’s eternally grateful attitude about how his life has turned out.

 

Fox has no use for pity. And he makes sure that time your spent with A Michael J. Fox Movie will only be inspiring and uplifting.

Te puede interesar
unnamed

in the name of the earth

Javier López Iglesias
REVIEWS

In the name of the earth , the new work by Dorotea Kobiela Welchman and Hugh Welchmann, Polish filmmakers who five years ago, with Loving Vincent , surprised us by giving life to Van Gogh's paintings through an elaborate technique that hand-colors the Scenes previously filmed with real actors, he once again displays sensitivity and ingenuity when filming, using the same technique, a rural drama based on a novel by Nobel Prize winner Wladyslaw S. Reymont.

Lo más visto